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CHEROKEE 1835 CENSUS

The 1835 Census of Cherokees East of the Mississippi is known as the Henderson Roll. The census was limited to the Cherokee Nation including parts of: Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee. Those with less than one quarter Indian blood were not included. General location of households was by State, County and waterway. Head of household and the number of full-bloods, half-bloods and quarter-bloods and whites married to Cherokees were enumerated. The number of males over18 and those under 18 were classified by number as well as females over 16 and those under 16. Information about occupations and the number that could read Cherokee and English were listed. The number of slaves and the nature of other property were described. The results were 16,542 Cherokees, 201 whites and 1,592 slaves. Since only quarter-bloods or higher were counted the total number of Cherokees was higher. Those living outside the Cherokee Nation including a large number in South Carolina were not included in the census or removal. The name of the head of household and the number of persons in the household is engraved on 14 panels alphabetically by State in the following format:

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD - CHEROKEES/WHITES/ SLAVES.

This data is from National Archives microfilm “TRA 06 The Henderson Roll ”, accessgeneaiogy.com/native and “ Those Who Cried” by James W. Tyner `is available from the Cherokee National Museum, Tahlequah, OK.

Traditionally family names came from the mother. Given names by which a person was known were based on their personality or circumstances.

There are three distinctly different kinds of names in the census:

1. CHEROKEE - Cherokee language names are in all capitals letters using English phonetics to pronounce the name. “WA TEE” would be and example and these were nearly always full-bloods

2. TRANSLATED - Cherokee given names that were translated into English. “Going Snake” would be an example. Many choose to be known by their given names in English even though they were full-bloods.

3 ENGLISH - These are traditional European names like John Smith. Many of the full-bloods adopted European names.

ALABAMA- GEORGIA - NORTH CAROLINA - TENNESSEE

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